Exclusive: take a 360-degree view of Gareth Pugh’s new Antigona costume

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The work of British fashion designer Gareth Pugh has always had a dramatic sensibility. For example, in 2006, the inflatable swimming pool was turned into arm candy, or the back of the 2014 autumn garment had a clockwork doll device.
In fact, Pugh started his costume design career as a teenager and eventually worked as an intern at Rick Owens. In 2006 for his debut solo track, at the same time also for Lady Gaga, RoisinMurphy and artists such as Beyonce design a successful career, and in 2012 at the royal opera house to open the ballet “Carbon Life” (Carbon Life) Eliogabalo, opera Garnier palace opened in Paris in 2016.
This year, Pugh is going through another theatrical challenge designed for Antigona’s costume design, which will open on Saturday at the literature art fair. Austria theatre director Stephen muller (Stephan Mueller) invited Turner prize nomination artist Goshka Macuga reworking of classic science fiction of cooperation, including the segway (Segways) on the singer, and in “Star Wars” (Star Wars) scroll text to imitate the opening.
This topic in order to maintain consistent, Pugh, not only design the suitable for science and the queen’s clothing, but also decided to London digital art company Werkflow digital format to present these works of 360 degrees, become the initiative.


“It breaks my heart when people say that Instagram is so important to their design work,” Pugh says. “Designers are close to in the form of 2 d design, but this is the world we live in – most people see your work on the screen or see it on your phone, through this program, we try to break the old system convey fashion image, need to have some kind of movement. ”
In the interactive preview, the audience manipulated the four different “behaviors” of Antigona and the resulting clothing. These works inspired by Pugh, “the spring of 2012” the appearance of the exoskeleton, he adapted to the characters of narration and opera singer’s actual demand, such as their ears and mouth exposed, this is actually not he thinks the series on the runway.
“It’s armor like a prison or a cage,” pique says. His inspiration comes from the clear lines of Japanese fantasy, rather than the steampunk inspiration, remembering that silhouette is the most important indicator of the audience, most of whom are far from the stage.
“At the end of the day, we’re actually just trying to make it very approachable,” pug said, and it’s not that you’re going to hear it coming out of the designer’s mouth. But with the help of technology, he found a way to communicate meaningfully to everyone.

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